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Nestlé unveils travel retail confectionery products

Nestlé International Travel Retail (NITR) has unveiled a range of products and experiences across its KitKat, Smarties and Nestlé Swiss brands for 2018.

There will be a particular focus on millennial and emerging middle-class travellers, in addition to an increase in sustainably sourced ingredients, smaller portions, reduced sugar and functional ingredients which support a healthier lifestyle.

Date: 20 October 2017

Source: Food & Drink International


Do we need to be more negative?

As nanotech applications become more diverse, the need for reliable vibration control has become critical says Dr David Platus. Forget air tables or even bungee cords - he thinks negative stiffness is the future of controlling bad vibes...

Date: 17 October 2017

Source: Laboratory News


Ellutia opens GC Excellence Academy in Cambridgeshire

Leading British gas chromatography supplier, Ellutia, has opened a dedicated training centre at its new state-of-the-art facility in Ely, Cambridgeshire.

The GC Excellence Academy will host training courses by Royal Society of Chemistry-approved independent trainer, Anthias Consulting, as well as Ellutia-led sessions by the company’s technical experts.

Date: 12 October 2017

Source: Lab Bulletin


Kellogg expands clean-label footprint with RXBAR acquisition

Kellogg Company has expanded its presence in the clean-label market with the acquisition of protein bar maker Chicago Bar Company for $600 million.

Date: 10 October 2017

Source: Food and Drink International


Self expanding clothes with Dyson Award

A student at Imperial College London has won this year’s UK Dyson Award for creating children’s clothes that grow along with their wearer.

The clothes, Petit Pli, were created by Ryan Yasin with the aim of tackling clothing waste and saving parents money. They are created using a specially engineered fabric with an auxetic structure – meaning when stretched, the fabric expands in all areas. To achieve the desired effect, the clothes were pleated.

Date: 6 October 2017

Source: Laboratory News


Nobel Chemistry Prize winners announced

Three scientists will share this year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their work on developing cryo-electron microscopy for the high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules in solution.

Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson have all been involved in research culminating in cryo-electron microscopy (EM) since at least the mid-1970s. Cryo-EM simplifies and improves the imaging of biomolecules, allowing scientists to understand chemical processes and also to research pharmaceuticals.

Date: 4 October 2017

Source: Laboratory News


British beet sugar industry hails deregulation of European sugar market

The British beet sugar industry has hailed the deregulation of the European sugar market as “great news for Britain”.

The 1st October sees the end of the European sugar regime, the final step that was agreed by EU Ministers in 2013 as part of a package of reforms of the European Common Agricultural Policy, with the vital backing of the British government.

Date: 2 October 2017

Source: Food and Drink International


Long range communication barriers broken

Researchers in the US have successfully demonstrated that devices running on nearly no power can transmit data across almost three kilometres.

Flexible electronics, such as patches that can capture motion range or monitor sweat to detect fatigue levels have great potential to collect medically relevant data. However they are limited by the fact that they cannot use bulky batteries, and as such, cannot communicate with devices more than a few metres away.

Date: 27 September 2017

Source: Laboratory News


Long range communication barriers broken

Researchers in the US have successfully demonstrated that devices running on nearly no power can transmit data across almost three kilometres.

Flexible electronics, such as patches that can capture motion range or monitor sweat to detect fatigue levels have great potential to collect medically relevant data. However they are limited by the fact that they cannot use bulky batteries, and as such, cannot communicate with devices more than a few metres away.

Date: 27 September 2017

Source: Laboratory News


Metal oxide discovered on exoplanet

A team of astronomers have discovered, for the first time, titanium oxide on the exoplanet WASP-19b.

Using the FORS2 spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope (VLT), the scientists were able to analyse the light passing through the exoplanet’s atmosphere as it passed in front of its mother star. They discovered that it contained small amounts of titanium oxide, water and traces of sodium alongside a strongly scattering global haze.

Date: 26 September 2017

Source: Laboratory News


GE sets new standard for monoclonal antibody purification

GE Healthcare has introduced a new Protein A chromatography resin, MabSelect PrismA, which will help biopharmaceutical manufacturers improve their monoclonal antibody (mAb) purification capacity by up to 40 %1. The resin is also significantly more alkaline-stable2, meaning that MabSelect PrismA can be cleaned with a higher concentration of sodium hydroxide to better control cross-contamination and bioburden risks.

Date: 25 September 2017

Source: Manufacturing Chemist


BIA and MHRA publish report following joint conference

The UK BioIndustry Association and the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency brought together experts from across the sector to discuss hot topics and important developments at their recent conference — Innovation in life sciences in a changing and dynamic environment

Date: 22 September 2017

Source: Building Better Healthcare


Healthcare data - data silos in NHS a risk to patient care?

In this article, Dr Saif Abed, chief medical officer (EMEA) at BridgeHead Software, discusses the essential role of data in delivering patient care in the NHS, arguing that the move to digital has just shifted paper online and that multiple data silos still exist, impacting on health providers’ ability to provide care across organisations

Date: 18 September 2017

Source: Building Better Healthcare


How big can a planet be?

The recent potential discovery of an exomoon orbiting a planet around another star came another astonishing finding – a planet with 3,000 times the mass of Earth. These discoveries push the limits of how we categorise objects in space and where we stand in the scale of things.

Date: 4 August 2017

Source: Discover Magazine


It's not easy being green

With chemical exposure accounting for an estimated 8.3 % of all deaths worldwide, it shouldn't come as any surprise that 'green chemistry' is becoming increasingly prominent. By 2020, the global market for green chemistry has been projected to grow to nearly £76 billion.

Date: 1st August 2017

Source: Laboratory News


Life as a chemistry professor

Ever wondered what life as a chemistry professor is like? 

Date: 29 August 2017

Source: Chromatography Online


Words of inspiration

A host of science writers discuss the books that fired their imaginations, and set them on their chosen paths. What books inspired you?

Date: 10 July 2017

Source: The Guardian


Planning for retirement

The government recently announcing that six million men and women will now have to wait a year longer than they expected for their state pension; it’s more important than ever to plan for retirement.  What are the key issues for people working in our hospitals?

Date: 16 August 2017

Source: Hospital Matters


A new class of chemical reaction discovered

A new class of chemical reaction has been discovered by researchers from Columbia University and Argonne National Laboratory. The reactions involve three different molecules in the bond making and/or breaking, and are called chemically termolecular (ie. three molecule) reactions.

Date: 17 August 2017

Source: Science News


Steroids not effective in non-asthmatic adults

Researchers at the Universities of Bristol, Nottingham, Oxford and Southampton have found that steroids aren't effective in treating acute lower respiratory tract infections in adults who don’t have asthma or other chronic lung diseases.


Date: 23 August 2017


Source: European Pharmaceutical Review


Lidl is now the 7th biggest supermarket in the UK

A new study of grocery market share figures by Kantar Worldpanel has found that Lidl is now the 7th largest supermarket chain in the UK, with 5.2 % of the marketing, overtaking Waitrose at 5.1 %.

Date: 22 August 2017

Source: BBC


Speed is of the essence in the diagnosis of sepsis

When it comes to diagnosing sepsis, speed is of the essence; it’s estimated that a patient’s chance of survival decreases by 7.6 % every hour that passes without effective treatment. A new treatment has been developed which could speed up the diagnosis.

Date: 15 August 2017

Source: The Analytical Scientist


Have your say on the Life Sciences and the Industrial Strategy inquiry

In its bid to make the UK the best place in the world to invest in life sciences, the House of Lords’ Science and Technology Committee has opened a new inquiry –  Life Sciences and the Industrial Strategy. The deadline for contributing to the inquiry is the 15th September, have you had your say yet?

Date: 24 August 2017

Source: Lab Bulletin


How to measure a nuclear blast


Since 1996, more than 180 countries have signed the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, which bans nuclear weapon testing, with notable exceptions being the USA and North Korea. An international monitoring system has been created to track potential violations, but how do they tell the difference between an earthquake and a nuclear test?

Date: 25 July 2017

Source: Science News

 


More than meets the eye

When you think of sharks, do you think of deadly killers of the oceans?  If you do, then you’re not alone, but here are 20 facts you might not know about these misunderstood creatures.

1st June 2016

Source: Discovery Magazine


The Queen’s Awards for Enterprise winners announced

The winners of the prestigious Queen’s Awards for Enterprise have been announced for 2017. European Pharmaceutical Manufacturer gives us a run through of some of this year’s winners.

Date: 21 June 2017

Source: European Pharmaceutical Manufacturer


Augmented reality is a group experience


You look to the left and see an elephant holding out a glowing orb for you. Have you gone mad? No. This is Disney Research's Magic Bench, a combined augmented and mixed reality experience. Making the surroundings instrumented rather than the individual allows people to share the experience as a group instead of individually.

Date: 26 July 2017

Source: Phys.org


Cassini spacecraft sends back spectacular images on voyage to Saturn

The Cassini spacecraft has almost completed its one-way voyage to Saturn.  On the 15th of September, it will dive into Saturn’s atmosphere and be destroyed to prevent infecting any nearby places with life it could be carrying. However, it continues to send back stunning images of its surroundings until then.

Date: 25 July 2017

Source: Independent


The world’s largest SLM facility opens in Germany

The world’s largest selective laser melting (SLM) facility has opened in Aachen, Germany, as part of a joint research project between Aachen Centre for 3D printing, the Aachen University of Applied Sciences and the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology (ILT).  The three-year research project includes more than 15 project partners and hopes to optimise the entire manufacturing process chain for large-volume metal components.

Date: 16 June 2016

Source: Laser Systems Europe

 

 

 


All change in bathroom design

The Internet of Thing (IoT) is transforming the way in which we live, from remotely controlled lights to smart fridges telling us we’re out of milk. But what about bathrooms?  It’s predicted that the IoT could revolutionise commercial and domestic bathrooms design, with smart sensors switching the lights off when the room is empty, and heat maps indicating whether the work bathroom is busy before you get there.  What will the next generation of bathroom technology bring?

Date: 19 July 2017
Source: Building Talk


Does ‘flying ant day’ exist?

Researchers from the University of Gloucestershire teamed up with the Royal Society of Biology to investigate whether ‘flying ant day’ really exists.  By asking members of the public to record when and where they saw flying ants, they were able to assess flight coordination and solve the mystery once and for all.

Date: 18 July 2017

Source: BBC


Should fractography be used more in the pharmaceutical industry?


Glass is the dominant packaging material used in the pharmaceutical industry for a number of reasons – it’s chemically inert, thermally stable and cheap to name a few. However, it also has one major disadvantage: it breaks. Fractography, the study of fracture surfaces, is still relatively unknown, but should we be using it more?

Date: 17 February 2017

Source: Manufacturing Chemist

 

 


Would you like amino acids with that?

Amino acid enriched water will soon be sold in the UK.  Rejuvenation Water contains L-Glutamine, which is used in the biosynthesis of proteins and is thought to offer a wide range of health benefits. Rejuvenation Water is currently in retailers John Lewis and Costco, with Holland and Barrett soon to be included.

Source: FDi Forum


Shiseido encouraging more women into science

Shiseido has announced the winners of its tenth annual Female Researcher Science Grant, which was set up to encourage more women into the sciences, regardless of age. Winners of the grant can use the funds for support and progressing their career development.

Source: Cosmetic Business


World’s first floating windfarm to be built in Scotland

Norwegian firm Statoil is developing the world’s first floating windfarm, Hywind, in Scottish waters. The £200 million project will see turbines being built in deeper waters off the coast of Peterhead, with each turbine expected to produce 6MW of electricity.

Source: The Guardian


Can room colour help patients to recover quicker?

A recent paper by paint specialists Dulux – Transforming the healing environment: Choosing colours and products that make a difference for patients – looks at the use of colour in healthcare facilities, and suggests that colour can actually aid the healing process.

Source: Building Better Healthcare


Predicting the laboratory of the future

What will the laboratory of the future look like, and what are the benefits and pitfalls that laboratories face on the road to digital convergence? 

Source: Scientific Computing World


Time, not materials, increases happiness

Research carried out by psychologists has found that individuals reported greater levels of happiness if they spent money on saving time – paying to have the house cleaned for example – rather than spending the money on material goods.

Source: BBC


Proposed plans to leave Euratom puts patients at risk

The UK’s proposed withdrawal from the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom) could put patients at risk. The UK doesn’t currently have the reactors needed to create the specific isotopes needed for cancer treatment, so these are supplied by reactors in France, Germany and Holland. Doctors warn that our proposed withdrawal from Euratom could threaten our supply of essential medical isotopes and put cancer patients’ lives at risk.

Source: European Pharmaceutical Review


Have astronomers discovered the first moon beyond our solar system?

Nasa's Kepler Space Telescope recently picked up a signal, which astronomers believe could be the first known moon outside our solar system. If confirmed, the ‘exomoon’ is likely to be about the size and mass of Neptune, and circles a planet the size of Jupiter but with 10 times the mass.

Source: BBC


Research from a group at the University of Texas suggests that the mere presence of a smartphone can impair cognitive capacity

The researchers found that subjects whose smartphones were in another room significantly outperformed those whose smartphones were visible, even if they were turned off, perhaps because part of the brain’s activity was devoted to actively ignoring the distraction.

Source: Science Daily


Scientists can now explain why you get that annoying suitcase wobble!

In a paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society A, researchers described the physics of the phenomenon and found that lowering the suitcase or moving faster can reduce the wobble. The research could be used to inform the design other two-wheeled carriers such as trailers.

Source: Science News


Designing the best research facilities

Scientists recently came together at the joint S-Lab/UKSPA conference in York to share the latest issues in research facility design, operation and management. Topics included ‘streamlining isolation’- moving away from static cleanroom design- and new and more efficient methods of ventilation and decontaminating air. The conference concluded with the S-Lab awards which recognise excellence in research facility design and management.

Source: Cleanroom Technology


The Bosphorus is changing colour

The recent change in the colour of the waters of the Bosphorus is not due to pollution according to scientists who have attributed the change to a surge in the growth of a particular species of plankton Emiliania huxleyi across the Black Sea.

Source: The Guardian


3.6% Americans have a food allergy

A recently published study in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology found that almost 4% of Americans have some type of food allergy. The review of almost 3 million medical records found that 1 in 6 Americans with a food allergy had had a documented anaphylactic event, but noted that a relatively low proportion of patients with some allergies had received follow-up allergy testing.

Source: Institute of Food Technologists


The future of airports?

A trial of a new biometric system in the US, could remove the need for boarding passes at airports by matching features to already stored passport, visa and immigration information.

Source: The Independent


Crumb-free bread will mean ISS astronauts can now bake in space

Astronauts may now be able to broaden their diet in space, thanks to German company Bake in Space which is working with the German Aerospace Centre to create a recipe for crumb-free bread, and an oven which can work at much lower wattage. The last sandwich enjoyed in space was in 1965, after which bread was banned due to the fire hazard posed by crumbs in the microgravity environment which could get into electrical systems.

Source: Science Mag


Cheap catalysts turn sunlight and carbon dioxide into fuel


Scientists in the US have successfully converted CO2 into carbon monoxide, using electricity from a solar cell and an inexpensive catalyst. The carbon monoxide can be combined with hydrogen atoms to produce hydrocarbon fuels.
The technique can't compete economically with existing fuel generation methods just yet, but it's an important step forward.

Source: Science Mag


Scalding hot gas giant breaks heat records


With surface temperatures reaching a sweltering 4300oC, the recently discovered KELT9b is a gas giant record-breaker. The planet-star hybrid orbits a star some 650 light years away, and has intrigued scientists with its unusual orbit.

Source: Science News


BioCity Group listed in Financial Times FT 1000 report as one of Europe’s fastest growing companies

The life science business incubator supports biotech and healthcare start-up companies with office/laboratory space, access to specialist laboratory equipment along with business support services. The company, with sites in Nottingham, Scotland and Cheshire, was listed 175th in the UK and 837th in Europe in terms of growth.

Source: Tomorrow's Laboratories


Signature biomarkers in pancreatic cancer


A new test for pancreatic cancer utilising nanotechnology can detect five proteins shed by pancreatic tumours into the bloodstream. The combination of the five biomarkers may help to diagnose the disease at an earlier stage of development.

Source: Science News


Rolling stock

German rail is using 3D printing of rolling stock to streamline its maintenance processes. So far more than 1000 spare parts have been produced- it is expected that over 15,000 will be produced by the end of next year.

Source: International Rail Journal


Topping the tables for robots

How many robots per head does your country have? Top of the table is South Korea, with over 500 industrial robots per 10,000 employees in the manufacturing industry.

Source: Mashable


Could biofuels soon be flying high?

New approaches to production may see biofuels approved by aviation standards authorities. Could the airline industry catch up with the automotive, energy and manufacturing industries by getting greener?

Source: SEI biofuels


Fasting could make you sharper as well as leaner

New research from a team at Swansea University has shown that the hunger hormone ghrelin can stimulate division of brain cells.

Source: New Scientist


Cranky crabs in broken shells often have the upper claw in fights


Sheer aggression rather than pure muscle strength often gives hermit crabs living in broken shells the edge during a fight. Broken shells constrain crabs' activities because they are heavy and a large portion of them unusable. Crabs living in broken shells value an intact shell and will fight more aggressively to get a better one. This is according to research conducted by Guillermina Alcaraz of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México in Mexico and Gastón Ignacio Jofre of Texas A&M University in the US. Their findings are published in Springer's journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology.

Source: Science Daily


Stanford scientists use nanotechnology to boost the performance of key industrial catalyst


A tiny amount of squeezing or stretching can produce a big boost in catalytic performance, according to a new study led by scientists at Stanford University and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Source: Eurek Alert


The top 15 generic drugmakers by 2016 revenue


Branded drugmakers weren't the only ones working through a tumultuous 2016. Generics companies faced pricing pressure, too. And while branded companies suffer pricing pain on costly cutting-edge therapies, generics outfits feel the pinch with already-thin margins, making pressure all the more agonizing.

Source: Fierce Pharma


Heat on for Australia's Great Barrier Reef when global temperatures hit 1.5C


Scientists have modeled how extremes in precipitation, drought, extreme heat and ocean temperatures will change in Australia at global temperatures 1.5°C and 2°C above pre-industrial conditions. It doesn't bode well for Australia's Great Barrier Reef.

Source: Science Daily


'Students need time to practise their science – but instead they are taught to simply regurgitate the facts'

Practical science lessons are often overshadowed by a mountain of facts and an emphasis on maths and English, writes the chief executive of the British Science Association

Source: TES


You bet – an intellectual wager can focus our attention


Gambling and science don't seem to mesh, but a playful bet can focus attention on the detail and force us to hone our arguments

THE Plataeans were besieged: walled in by their enemies, the Spartans. They could make ladders to climb out, but how tall should they be? Citizens were asked to guess the wall’s height by counting its bricks, with the most popular estimate taken as correct. It worked: 212 duly escaped.

Source: New Scientist


Government releases plan to tackle nitrogen dioxide pollution

Draft air quality plan aims to bring UK emissions back down to legal levels

The UK’s plan to tackle nitrogen dioxide levels could include zones where additional congestion charges are applied to diesel vehicles, and improved emissions information for car buyers. The draft of the UK Air Quality Plan was published last week after attempts to postpone its release until after the general election were blocked by the high court.

Source: Royal Society of Chemistry


What will it take to break the 2-hour marathon?

Kenya’s Dennis Kimetto holds the world record for the marathon at 2:02:57. Two other runners, Kenenisa Bekele and Eliud Kipchoge, have recorded times below 2:03:10. Shaving 3 minutes off those times amounts to roughly a 2.5% performance improvement. Although that might not seems astronomical to the casual runner, Ross Tucker, a sports scientist at the University of Cape Town in South Africa, points out that professional marathon runners are far from casual. “That magnitude (2.5%) of improvement in performance at the elite level is absolutely enormous.”

To get faster, the runner must either become more powerful or more efficient, or the course must become easier.

Source: Science Mag


Novel Antibacterial Wound Cover Could Prevent Thousands of Infections Each Year

A new type of wound dressing could improve thousands of people's lives, by preventing them from developing infections. The dressing, a type of compression held in place by a bandage, uses an antibacterial substance formed from the shells of crustaceans like shrimps. It is described in a paper published in the May issue of Radiation Physics and Chemistry.

Source: ALN


New printer creates color by shaping nanostructures

Carving nanostructures with a laser creates long-lasting colors.

Researchers developed the new printing technique as an alternative to ink-based printing, in which colors fade with time. Aside from eternally vibrant art, the technique could lead to new types of color displays or improve security labels, the scientists report in the May 5 Science Advances.

Source: Science News


Bumblebees: Pesticide 'reduces queen egg development'

Use of a common pesticide in spring could have an impact on wild bumblebees by interfering with their life cycle, a UK study suggests.

The team, who looked at wild bumblebees caught in the English countryside, say the insecticide, thiamethoxam, reduces egg development in queen bees.

They say this is likely to reduce bee populations later in the year.

Source: BBC


The predictions Tomorrow's World got right as it returns to our TV screens

Tomorrow's World is coming back to the BBC as a year-long series of science programmes.

The show, which ran from 1965 to 2003, made lots of accurate predictions about how technology would change in the future.

It introduced audiences to inventions we now take for granted, including the mobile phone and cash machines.

But it also showcased some crazy and weird creations that never caught on at all...

Source: BBC


Synchronising brain waves

When we perform demanding mental tasks the brain often has to engage multiple different regions that are specialised at performing specific functions at the same time and then exchange information between them. The theory goes that these disparate brain areas link up by synchronising the pattern of nerve firing in both; so what would happen, Ines Violante wondered, if she artificially enhanced the degree of synchronisation - would a person’s intellect be boosted? Chris Smith found out what she learnt...

Source: The Naked Scientist


Glowing bacteria detect buried landmines

More than 100 million landmines lay hidden in the ground around the world, but glowing bacteria may help us find them, according to a new study. The approach relies on small quantities of vapor released from the common explosive TNT. Previously, researchers engineered Escherichia coli (pictured), a bacterial species abundant in the environment and in mammalian intestines, to glow green upon detection of DNT, a byproduct of TNT.

Source: Science Mag


Thermo Fisher Scientific collaborates with CGT Catapult to create seamless cell and gene therapy supply chain

To help address the challenges surrounding supply chain management for cell and gene therapy around the globe, Thermo Fisher Scientific, the world leader in serving science, today announced a collaboration with the Cell and Gene Therapy Catapult (CGT Catapult) to provide developers with both the manufacturing capability and distribution, logistics, and storage capacity needed to create a seamless supply chain to accelerate cell and gene therapy development and commercialsation.

Source: News medical life sciences


Sartorius and EMBL announce new partnership

Sartorius has joined the European Molecular Biology Laboratory’s Corporate Partnership Program.

The program aims to foster advancing training collaboration and activities that are designed to connect industry to academia.

Source: Laboratory News


Preventing food waste over the festive period

Collectively, people living in Scotland could save more than £90 million by not wasting food this festive season – a saving of £38 for every household in Scotland.

Source: Food and Drink International


Chemists find novel method to control catalysis

Scientists in Canada have discovered a new technique that enables them to manipulate catalytic reactions.

By using a combination of experiments and a mathematical model, they discovered that the position of a molecule on a copper catalyst’s surface enabled the breaking of one chemical bond 100 times faster than the other.

Source: Laboratory News


Drug improves epilepsy for people with partial onset seizures

A two-year study included 52 patients with partial onset (focal) seizures across 12 neurology departments in Portugal. Patients were insufficiently controlled with one anti-epileptic drug (AED) and had initiated eslicarbazepine acetate as adjunctive treatment.

Source: EPM


Is hazard-based materials regulation holding beauty back?

The IFSCC 2016 Congress has dedicated a morning session to regulatory compliance and its potential to stifle innovation in 'The balancing act: regulatory compliance v innovation'. One of the more interesting topics related to regulation of ingredients and how different areas of the world take different methodological approaches to this important topic.

Source: Cosmetic Business